THE BEST WAY TO PREPARE A TALK

What is Preparation? Reading a Book? This is one kind, but not the best. Reading may help, but if one attempts to lift a lot of thoughts out of a book and give them out immediately as his own, the whole performance will be lacking in something. The audience may not know precisely what is lacking but they will not warm to the speaker.

Preparation is not getting together of some faultless phrases written down or memorized, not the assembly of some few casual thoughts that really convey very little to the audience.

Preparation means thinking, brooding, recalling, selecting the ones that appeal to you most, polishing them, working them into pattern, a mosaic of your own.

When you choose a subject, write the name of it on the outside of a large envelope. Have many of such envelopes. When reading and you meet a good thing on the subject you are to talk on, slip it into the right envelope.

From time to time during this brooding and hatching process, jot down notes, fragments, sentences here and there on stray envelopes, scraps of paper until you are reading to sit down and arrange them in order, and to write and revise the whole thing, and to shape it up for delivery and publication.

Do not make the mistake of trying to cover too much ground in a brief talk. Just take one or two angles of a subject and attempt to cover them adequately. Determine your subject in advance, so that you will have time to think it over in odd moment. Make it a topic of conversation.

Ask yourself all possible questions concerning it. If, for example you are to speak an divorce, what are the effects economically socially. How can the evil be remedied? Should there be uniform divorce laws? Or should there be divorce laws?

When a teacher has a real message in his head and heart and inner urge to speak, he is almost sure to do himself credit. A well-prepared speech is already 90% delivered.

Real preparation consists in digging something out of yourself, in assembling and arranging your thoughts, in cherishing and nurturing your own convictions.

Do not sit down and try to manufacture a speech in thirty minutes. A speech must grow. Select a topic early and make it a topic of conversation. Ask yourself all possible questions concerning it. Ideas, suggestions, illustrations will come drifting to you at sundry time – when you are bathing, when you are driving, when you are waiting for dinner to be served.

After you have done a bit of independent thinking, go to the library and do some reading on your topic. Collect far more materials than you intend to use.

The way to develop reserve power is to know far more than you can use, to have full reservoir of information.

What is Preparation? Reading a Book? This is one kind, but not the best. Reading may help, but if one attempts to lift a lot of thoughts out of a book and give them out immediately as his own, the whole performance will be lacking in something. The audience may not know precisely what is lacking but they will not warm to the speaker.

Preparation is not getting together of some faultless phrases written down or memorized, not the assembly of some few casual thoughts that really convey very little to the audience.

Preparation means thinking, brooding, recalling, selecting the ones that appeal to you most, polishing them, working them into pattern, a mosaic of your own.

When you choose a subject, write the name of it on the outside of a large envelope. Have many of such envelopes. When reading and you meet a good thing on the subject you are to talk on, slip it into the right envelope.

From time to time during this brooding and hatching process, jot down notes, fragments, sentences here and there on stray envelopes, scraps of paper until you are reading to sit down and arrange them in order, and to write and revise the whole thing, and to shape it up for delivery and publication.

Do not make the mistake of trying to cover too much ground in a brief talk. Just take one or two angles of a subject and attempt to cover them adequately. Determine your subject in advance, so that you will have time to think it over in odd moment. Make it a topic of conversation.

Ask yourself all possible questions concerning it. If, for example you are to speak an divorce, what are the effects economically socially. How can the evil be remedied? Should there be uniform divorce laws? Or should there be divorce laws?

When a teacher has a real message in his head and heart and inner urge to speak, he is almost sure to do himself credit. A well-prepared speech is already 90% delivered.

Real preparation consists in digging something out of yourself, in assembling and arranging your thoughts, in cherishing and nurturing your own convictions.

Do not sit down and try to manufacture a speech in thirty minutes. A speech must grow. Select a topic early and make it a topic of conversation. Ask yourself all possible questions concerning it. Ideas, suggestions, illustrations will come drifting to you at sundry time – when you are bathing, when you are driving, when you are waiting for dinner to be served.

After you have done a bit of independent thinking, go to the library and do some reading on your topic. Collect far more materials than you intend to use.

The way to develop reserve power is to know far more than you can use, to have full reservoir of information.

Source by Markbor

jakobs

Add Your Comment